Queen of the Conquered

Review From User :

PS I really love how people after reading my review start implying I'm a racist. Proves my idea that our contemporaries, sadly, can't really read. Or maybe they can make words from letters but they have lost the ability to understand the gist of what they're reading. *eyeroll* Too bad.

Racism as the most salient topic
Racism is insanely boring (at least as it was represented in here). I almost didn't think I'd have it in me to follow through all the skin-colour-themed debacles. In real life, I imagine, it's even worse. Does one wake up and start thinking racing things or do they have some business to do

I've got some questions to the people of the countries that practiced (or maybe still do) racism: how the fuck can people, sane and seemingly adequate, find time and will and effort and energy to go about all the racist bullshit Were they bored Had they nothing better to do No other endeavours to apply themselves to Sad people with pathetic little minds.

People should really consider doing all kinds better things with their brains other than going through their lives thinking petty, stupid, pathetic and harmful thoughts such as racist thoughts. There are so many other, more wholesome and healthy and useful things that one could expend their mental energy on: the beauty of this world, literature, history, human development, the secrets of the universe, etc. etc. etc. And instead racists lock themselves behind the mental bars of hatred and subject everyone else to a horrible treatment. Sounds like a 'lose-lose' for everyone: the society, the people who are subjected to racism and... ta-da! even to racists themselves...

So, while the book's dealing with the topic a lot worse than a 5 star book should, I'm not docking any stars for that since the topic's worth it and it hasn't been mangled altogether like so many other books on this same topic.

Stupidity
The book - everyone in it behaved in the most moronic way imaginable. I'm not even going to count all the instances: I'll just relax and consider this to be a fun book about really stupid people.

In all seriousness, there isn't a single character who did not behave in the most stupid ways. I don't think I've ever seen such a set of dolts (both islanders and masters) in a good book.

In all seriousness, most of the Fejrn don't really want to be on the islands and most of the islanders don't want them to be there, none of the island actors communicate (even though they actually could act as a unique front or something), it's pathetic how everyone wallows in the mess of their own creation. But that's me and the plot being a bit at odds with each other.

Everyone is plotting against everyone else and perceives others only as tools and is ready to stab the next person in the back at the nearest opportunity. The deceived are the deceivers at all times. The whole is plenty disgusting to behold. I think the idea must have been that whenever one inflicts something upon the world, the world responds in kind, with a taste of one's own medicine (i.e. Marieke vs Sigourney vs rebels vs Fejd vs everyone else). Communication is crucial and it's incredibly backwards throughout the whole mess.

Angst
One could eat all the angst with a spoon: all the guilt trips, righteousness, constant mess that the characters insist on creating just to wallow in it all even more...

As I'm a sucker for angst, I think #2 will be a fair read. If it comes forward.

Q:
The ocean has always terrified me. It isn't meant for the living. The water, burning my eyes and nose and throat, can so easily fill my lungs; the power of the tide can pull me beneath its waves. Most frightening of all are the spirits. (c)
Q:
I feel that there's regret in his gut, regret he hopes I won't see, though he knows any emotion he has, any thought of his, belongs to me. If I will it, I can hear his thoughts the way I might think to myself; his emotions become my own. It requires effort, yes-energy, to make my mind become one with another's-but after holding this kraft for so many years, it's a skill that comes with the ease of racing across the fields of Lund Helle, or holding my breath beneath the sea. (c)
Q:
He prayed to the gods of the masters, asking for forgiveness, even though the masters don't believe that taking the life of an islander is a sin, and so there would be nothing to forgive. (c)
Q:
For a moment, I feel death-know what it is to die, just as I have felt a thousand times. (c)
Q:
Most would rather pray to the Fjern gods, hoping for freedom, than fight for their freedom in life. In a way, I admire the dead rebels at my feet. (c)
Q:
Working. This is easier than saying his parents are slaves. (c)
Q:
"Focus only on yourself and your ambitions... and soon you'll find that you care not what a single person thinks. Not even your gods." ()
Q:
I miss my mother, and the years that I never got to have with her. (c)
Q:
"If you aren't careful, the Jannik family might inherit your enemies."
"The Lund family is strong enough that it doesn't matter which enemies you inherit. You should be grateful." ()
Q:
If I'd been told as a child that I deserve to own all I see, maybe I would believe it, too. But it's because I haven't been told this, and they have, that I'll succeed over them; this I know, because while they sit and wait to be handed this world, I'll work and I'll fight for my position. I'll succeed, while they wait for me to fail. (c)
Q:
His life holds the strength of the generations of spirits who came before him. All the islanders who line up behind him like an army, giving him the power to continue the fight that they could not.(c)
Q:
It's easy, when surrounded by people who question you, to begin questioning yourself. (c)
Q:
He exuded the confidence only a person who knows the world belongs to them can exude: There's no need for self-consciousness, or to second-guess your actions, or the words that fall from your mouth, when you know there will be no consequence-when you know that the world will still be yours. (c)
Q:
She has always wanted to learn as much as she could, reading her texts and studying her sciences, doing her experiments on herbs and blood; but for Erik, his curiosity appeared in other ways. His was a curiosity for life. Curiosity for others: for their bodies, for their lives. He longed to know the stories of the people around him. Longed to know their motivations, their desires. (c)
Q:
Gods, what he could do with this kraft of mine: learn the secrets of all those around him, learn of their desires so that he can fulfill them. Erik doesn't believe in forcing the loyalty of others. He believes in inspiring such a love in followers that they would die for him. (c)
Q:
It's interesting to me that he can feel confident that he'll live, but is also resigned to die. (c)
Q:
Yes, of course Marieke was my slave, when I wouldn't grant her the coin my family owed her for her years of service, along with the coin owed her dead daughter and the girl's father. How could she be anything but a slave, when she had nowhere to live, no food to eat, no opportunity She'd had no choice but to stay with me, Løren believes, and this perhaps was the worst sort of slavery: one that's mocking as it declares its freedom, punishing Marieke for making her imagine it's her own choice in staying. (c)


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